Arrow Fat Left Icon Arrow Fat Right Icon Arrow Right Icon Cart Icon Close Circle Icon Expand Arrows Icon Facebook Icon Instagram Icon Twitter Icon Hamburger Icon Information Icon Down Arrow Icon Mail Icon Mini Cart Icon Person Icon Ruler Icon Search Icon Shirt Icon Triangle Icon Bag Icon Play Video

Art

Tools for Collective Learning

+++The Name Change Initiative of Kunstinstituut Melly, the institution formerly known as Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art+++

+++Sofía Hernández Chong Cuy, with Rosa de Graaf, Jessy Koeiman, Jeroen Lavèn, and Vivian Ziherl [eds.]+++

ISBN 978-94-92852-69-4
Price € 19,50
Editors Sofía Hernández Chong Cuy, with Rosa de Graaf, Jessy Koeiman, Jeroen Lavèn, and Vivian Ziherl
Texts Veronica Babayan, Teana Boston-Mammah, Tayler Calister, Boutaina Hammana, Yahaira Brito Morfe, Callum Dean, Rosa de Graaf, Sofía Hernández Chong Cuy, Michiel Huijben, Wooseok Jung, Stijn Kemper, Alex Klein, Jessy Koeiman, Prem Krishnamurthy, Nina Schouten, Alexander Tanazefti, Emily Turner, Rolando Vázquez Melken, Aqueene Wilson, Yan Zhihan, Vivian Ziherl
Translation Louise Schoondergang, James Hannan, Milou van Lieshout, Jet van den Toorn
Graphic design Julie Peeters
Number of pages 288
Book size 17 x 24 cm
Binding softcover
Printer Vier-Türme GmbH, Benedict Press
Language English
Release date November 2022
Publisher Jap Sam Books

Kunstinstituut Melly is supported by the city of Rotterdam and the Ministry of Education, Culture and Science in the Netherlands. Additional support is provided by the Hartwig Art Foundation.

This publication is part of Kunstinstituut Melly's Name Change Initiative, which is in part supported by stichting Droom en Daad, Fonds voor Cultuurparticipatie, BankGiro Loterij Fonds, DOEN Foundation, Stichting Elise Mathilde Fonds, J.E. Jurriaanse Foundation, Volkskracht, Prins Bernhard Cultuurfonds

+++

| Published in a Dutch and English edition

On January 27, 2021, the institution formerly known as Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art in Rotterdam was renamed Kunstinstituut Melly. The renaming was and is informed by local debates and international discussions; it is mobilized by ambitions that relate to social transformation, and by the felt responsibility in visualizing these changes, since the role as a contemporary art institution is presenting and discerning the present. This book is about the arrival at such criteria and ideas, as much as it is about the intricacies involved in our institution’s name change. As suggested by the book’s title, Tools for Collective Learning, the aim for this publication is to be more of a toolbox than a document. It is made with the conviction that all vital change happens through collective learning; that recording oral histories and discursively articulating embedded experiences can further this cause. The name Melly was inspired by Melly Shum Hates Her Job, an artwork by Ken Lum. This artwork takes the form of a billboard, and it has been displayed on the institution’s façade since 1990.

‘The name change was premised on the criteria that the former name impinged upon a pursuit of social inclusivity, which is vital to the relevance and contribution of cultural practice in general.’

www.kunstinstituutmelly.nl


 

The Name Change Initiative of Kunstinstituut Melly, the institution formerly known as Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art

Sofía Hernández Chong Cuy, with Rosa de Graaf, Jessy Koeiman, Jeroen Lavèn, and Vivian Ziherl [eds.]

$22.00

Tools for Collective Learning

The Name Change Initiative of Kunstinstituut Melly, the institution formerly known as Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art

Sofía Hernández Chong Cuy, with Rosa de Graaf, Jessy Koeiman, Jeroen Lavèn, and Vivian Ziherl [eds.]

$22.00

Art / New titles / Theory

ISBN 978-94-92852-69-4
Price € 19,50
Editors Sofía Hernández Chong Cuy, with Rosa de Graaf, Jessy Koeiman, Jeroen Lavèn, and Vivian Ziherl
Texts Veronica Babayan, Teana Boston-Mammah, Tayler Calister, Boutaina Hammana, Yahaira Brito Morfe, Callum Dean, Rosa de Graaf, Sofía Hernández Chong Cuy, Michiel Huijben, Wooseok Jung, Stijn Kemper, Alex Klein, Jessy Koeiman, Prem Krishnamurthy, Nina Schouten, Alexander Tanazefti, Emily Turner, Rolando Vázquez Melken, Aqueene Wilson, Yan Zhihan, Vivian Ziherl
Translation Louise Schoondergang, James Hannan, Milou van Lieshout, Jet van den Toorn
Graphic design Julie Peeters
Number of pages 288
Book size 17 x 24 cm
Binding softcover
Printer Vier-Türme GmbH, Benedict Press
Language English
Release date November 2022
Publisher Jap Sam Books

Kunstinstituut Melly is supported by the city of Rotterdam and the Ministry of Education, Culture and Science in the Netherlands. Additional support is provided by the Hartwig Art Foundation.

This publication is part of Kunstinstituut Melly's Name Change Initiative, which is in part supported by stichting Droom en Daad, Fonds voor Cultuurparticipatie, BankGiro Loterij Fonds, DOEN Foundation, Stichting Elise Mathilde Fonds, J.E. Jurriaanse Foundation, Volkskracht, Prins Bernhard Cultuurfonds

| Published in a Dutch and English edition

On January 27, 2021, the institution formerly known as Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art in Rotterdam was renamed Kunstinstituut Melly. The renaming was and is informed by local debates and international discussions; it is mobilized by ambitions that relate to social transformation, and by the felt responsibility in visualizing these changes, since the role as a contemporary art institution is presenting and discerning the present. This book is about the arrival at such criteria and ideas, as much as it is about the intricacies involved in our institution’s name change. As suggested by the book’s title, Tools for Collective Learning, the aim for this publication is to be more of a toolbox than a document. It is made with the conviction that all vital change happens through collective learning; that recording oral histories and discursively articulating embedded experiences can further this cause. The name Melly was inspired by Melly Shum Hates Her Job, an artwork by Ken Lum. This artwork takes the form of a billboard, and it has been displayed on the institution’s façade since 1990.

‘The name change was premised on the criteria that the former name impinged upon a pursuit of social inclusivity, which is vital to the relevance and contribution of cultural practice in general.’

www.kunstinstituutmelly.nl