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Bookazines / Series

  • A Photographic Portrait of a Landscape
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    A Photographic Portrait of a Landscape

    +++New Dimensions in Landscape Philosophy+++

    +++Pietsie Feenstra, Wapke Feenstra, myvillages.org+++

    ISBN

    978-94-90322-37-3

    Graphic designer

    Mind Design - Niels Schrader

    Number of pages

    272

    Book size

    15,5 x 22 cm

    Binding

    Paperback

    Date of Release: November 2012

    English

    In 2010 Jap Sam Books and Myvillages formed an editorial alliance to produce a new series of books.  This is the second publication in this series of books.

    Translation NL-EN Kathleen van Overzee-McMillian

    The research for this publication was supported by Fryslan 2018 and Villagers of Wjelsryp.

    This publication was made possible by the Mondriaan Fund and the Netherlands Architecture Fund.

    +++

    The term 'landscape' lends itself to countless associations and expectations: there is no single, clear-cut definition of landscape. That's what makes landscape such a good starting point for philosophical questions about the dynamics of cultural centres, the views of institutions and the evolution of culture in a natural environment. 

    Who actually owned the land? Who created the landscape? Who determined the cultural rhythm? Who laid claim to the soil?  This book unravels these questions and more.

    A Photographic Portrait of a Landscape is a micro study that explores cultural centres and land ownership. The expansion of the European Union has been accompanied by a growing interest in national identity, which uses landscape as a projection screen for envisaged expectations. The theories of Ton Lemaire (Filosofie van het landschap,1970) and the post-colonial approach to culture of Homi K. Bhabha (The Location of Culture, 1994) are our guides on a journey through a landscape in the north of the Netherlands. 

    Pietsie Feenstra's (Sorbonne Nouvelle, Paris III) essay on cultural history takes us on a filmic journey through a terp landscape in the Dutch province of Friesland, interpreting and uncovering its secrets by sifting through photographic images and delving into archives.  She was inspired by an album of photos from 1978 that show the Frisian village of Wjelsryp.

    The visual essay by Wapke Feenstra (myvillages.org) is a collation of recent landscape photos, photos taken by local residents, poetry, information about the land, and a grass herbarium. The landscape is presented from the perspective of the local dweller. 

    In the book eight poems by Beart Oosterhaven included, translated in to English by Geart fan der Mear.

    About the authors
    Pietsie Feenstra lectures in the Cinéma et Audiovisuel, Arts et Média Department at the Sorbonne Nouvelle, Paris III, where she gained her PhD in 2001. She is part of the Théâtres de la Mémoire research group at the Sorbonne and specialises in the relationship between visual culture and historical writings in changing political contexts. Her latest publications include Miradas sobre pasado y presente en el cine español (1990-2005), Hub. Hermans (ed.), Rodopi, 2008; Mémoire du cinéma espagnol 1975-2007, (ed.) CinémAction, 2009; New Mythological Figures in Spanish Cinema. Dissident Bodies under Franco, Amsterdam University Press, 2011. 

    Wapke Feenstra is an artist who derives her inspiration by tapping into local knowledge. Her projects include Former Farmland (Ars Electronica, Linz 2008 and Oldenburg 2009), which explores how memories on a two-dimensional photographic screen can redefine and question the sites that we encounter. Her Moving Landscape project, which ran from 2009 till 2011 in Genk (Belgium) and the surroundings, was a visual roam through land use and primary industries. Feenstra intervenes in an existing visual experiential ecology, in an existing landscape (usually rural, but not always) in order to coax the locals and visitors into providing new or current readings of that landscape. 

    myvillages.org
    Myvillages.org - In 2003 Kathrin Böhm (London, UK), Wapke Feenstra (Rotterdam, NL) and Antje Schiffers (Berlin, GER) founded myvillages.org, an artists' initiative that explores the rural environment as a place for and of cultural production. Under the umbrella of myvillages.org, they run long-term and collaborative projects such as the Bibliobox and the International Village Shop. Working in different constellations, they organise multidisciplinary rural conventions, sell goods in one-hour-village-shops, publish books, screen films and mount exhibitions. Lately, they filled a year-long larder with food, drinks and knowledge to host guests in Haus der Kulturen der Welt in Berlin (2011).

    €24.50

  • An Equine Anthology
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    An Equine Anthology

    +++ +++

    +++Nell Boeschenstein, Josh Garrett-Davis, Richard Saxton, Kirsten Stoltz (eds.)+++


    ISBN

    978-94-90322-54-0

    Graphic designer

    Peter de Kan

    Number of pages

    250

    Book size

    11 x 18 cm

    Binding

    softcover

    An Equine Anthology is the second Center Pivot publication the Last Chance Press of M12 Studio. It is published as a special limited edition, in a print run of 250 copies. Co-publishers: M12 Collective and the Last Chance Press.

    Through interdisciplinary approaches, this series explores and connects the changing realities of rural landscapes and communities around the world.

    English

    Release date: April 2015

    +++

    An Equine Anthology stitches together non-linear histories, testimonies, and interpretations of equine culture from the American Southwest and beyond. Far from representing binaries of the romantic and mundane, of personality and commodity, An Equine Anthology presents the reader with a broad topographical view of the horse, an image that reaches well beyond that of American mythology. M12's anthology combines poetics with research methodologies that delve into the unseen, hidden, and overlooked to create a work that is greater than the sum of its parts.”  - Sanjit Sethi 

    With Contributions by

    Clea G. Hall is a photographer and horse owner from Placitas, New Mexico.

    Matthew Fluharty is director of Art of the Rural, a collaborative organization based in St. Louis.

    Jaune Quick-to-See Smith is an artist working in Corrales, New Mexico.

    Temple Grandin is an animal welfare expert based in Ft. Collins, Colorado.

    M12 is an interdisciplinary art collective headquartered in Byers, Colorado.

    The Brunetti Family operates the TBR Ranch, a horse-boarding facility in Ft. Lupton, Colorado.

    Matt Slaby is a photographer and writer based in Denver.

    Nell Boeschenstein is a writer from Charlottesville, Virginia.

    Oli Robbins is a writer for the Sandoval Signpost, New Mexico. The included profile was originally published in February 2014.

    Wapke Feenstra is an artist based in Rotterdam, and co-founder of Myvillages.

    Kultivator is an art and farming collective in Dyestad, Sweden.

    Josh Garrett-Davis is a writer and historian living in Los Angeles.

    Richard Saxton is an artist and educator who lives in Denver. He is the founder and creative director of M12.

    Kirsten Stoltz is a curator living in Denver. She is the director of programs for M12.

    Stuart Hyatt, who recorded a sonic counterpart to this volume, is founder of TEAM Records and lives in Indianapolis.

    €18.95

  • Boxset Soleca Planedo
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    Boxset Soleca Planedo

    +++ +++

    +++Susan Kooi+++

    ISBN

    978-94-92852-00-7

    Graphic designer

    Carolina Aboarrage

    English, Dutch Italian

    Copy editing: Aaron Bogart

    Silk screen printing: Sarai de Haan

    Made possible by the AFK / Amsterdams Fonds voor de Kunst.

    +++

     

    Boxset Soleca Planedocontains the triptych Lonely Planet,in which artist Susan Kooi is recontextualising and poetically reconstructing ceramic artefacts, exploring the material as a time machine. Each publication is an alternative travel book for a place with a long clay tradition, showing the works Kooi made during her trips, their background stories adapted into essays, (science) fiction, poetry and manga by various writers. Campania Felix contains terracotta works made in the Campania region in Italy, Yamatai Koku (邪馬台国) is set in Arita, Japan and revolves around porcelain, and inEscoural-O-Novothefocus lays on the glazing process of the Evora region in Portugal.

    Including: Lonely Planet: Campania Felix, Lonely Planet: Yamatai Koku (邪馬台国), Lonely Planet: Escoural-O-Novo

    €60.00

  • Company: Movements, Deals and Drinks
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    Company: Movements, Deals and Drinks

    +++ +++

    +++Myvillages, Kathrin Bohm, Miranda Pope (eds.), with textcontribtions by Kathrin Bohm, David Boyle, Céline Condorelli, Seb Emina, Gilda O'Neill, Doina Petrescu and Constantin Petcou, Miranda Pope, Marijke Steedman+++

    ISBN

    978-94-90322-56-4

    Graphic designer

    Niels Schrader, Mind Design

    Number of pages

    240

    Book size

    15.5 x 22 cm

    Binding

    Softcover

    English

    439 grms

    Release date: October 2015. Book launch during Frieze London, and Frankfurt Book Fair.

    Company: Movements, Deals and Drinks is the winner of the 2014 Create Art Award by Create London and supported by Bank of America Merrill Lynch.
    The London Borough of Barking and Dagenham supports the project since 2014.

    Myvillages is a pan-national artist group founded in 2003 by Kathrin Böhm, Wapke Feenstra, and Antje Schiffers. Its work addresses the evolving relationship between the rural and the urban, looking at different forms of production, pre-conceptions and power relationships.

    Current and recent projects include International Village Show (2014 – 16) for the Museum of Contemporary Art Leipzig, Germany,  Forms of Lending Shapes, A-Z Marzona Collection, Hamburger Bahnhof, Berlin, Umeå Pantry for Bildmuseet Umeå, Sweden and Farmers and Ranchers with M12, Colorado, USA and Fries Museum, the Netherlands.

    Myvillages works on a number of long-term projects with a focus on the particular local, but all projects develop trans-local connections within pan cultural and  pan national networks, for example in projects such as I like being a farmer and want to stay one, the Bibliobox and the International Village Shop, all started around 2005 and ongoing.

    +++

    One of London's well-remembered but fairly unknown histories is that between the early 1800s to the 1950s up to 250,000 working-class Londoners – mainly women and children – would leave the East End to spend the late summer weeks in the Kent countryside to 'go picking', creating a unique urban-rural relationship and lived culture.

    Company: Movements, Deals and Drinks is a long-term art project by Myvillages to revisit the 'picking days' while at the same time opening up a full circle of fruit harvest, beverage production and drinks trade as a collective endeavour. 

    Company: Movements, Deals and Drinks looks at the complex social currency, histories and politics of access to the countryside, food production, everyday culture and current interest in commoning. These ideas are explored by navigating relationships between rural processes, urban communities and local land use in order to establish a new kind of company.

    In its proposition, Company: Movements, Deals and Drinks is reminding us that rural and urban conditions are inherently connected in multiple ways, and the book follows the productive and reproductive cycles of the project in order to describe and expand on the different anticipated and practiced meanings of the project's four word title.

    About the editors

    Kathrin Böhm is a founding member of Myvillages and the London-based art and architecture group Public Works, whose participatory and collaborative public realm and design works include Park Products for Serpentine Galleries, London and 1000 bags here and now for Whitechapel Gallery, London. Böhm has recently curated Trade Show, together with Gavin Wade, for Eastside Projects in Birmingham and RUrban in Paris and is a co-organiser of the trans-local Eco Nomadic School network. Böhm is running monthly Haystacks in London, a series of informal events about rural realities and links.

    Miranda Pope is a writer, curator and researcher in the department of Art at Goldsmiths. She is developing a notion of the ecological that is understood as an on-going process of thinking and doing that exposes and questions interests of all entities within assemblages, along with the intertwined politics of doing this, and exploring the possibilities for new curatorial forms to emerge out of it.

    €24.50

  • Cool Pastoral Splendor
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    Cool Pastoral Splendor

    +++ +++

    +++Richard Saxton, Kurt Wagner, epilogue by Kirsten Stoltz+++

    ISBN

    ISBN 978-94-90322-53-3

    Graphic designer

    Peter de Kan

    Number of pages

    250

    Book size

    11 x 18 cm

    Binding

    Softcover

    English

    Release date: April 2015

    Cool Pastoral Splendor is the first Center Pivot publication the Last Chance Press of M12 Studio. It is published as a special limited edition, in a print run of 250 copies. Co-publishers: M12 Collective and the Last Chance Press.

    Through interdisciplinary approaches, this series explores and connects the changing realities of rural landscapes and communities around the world.

    +++

    Cool Pastoral Splendor includes a selection of pictures from Richard Saxton's Rural Research Archive and accompanying writings by Kurt Wagner. Saxton and Wagner are among a rare breed of artists focusing on the non-heroic, psychic and lyrical unfolding of daily events. Both Saxton and Wagner infuse the work with their own rural experiences, but no single genre or culture captures the whole of these intentions. Cool Pastoral Splendor leaves us in search of beauty hidden in plain sight.”  -Kirsten Stoltz

    €18.95

  • Creativity and Other Fundamentalisms
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    Creativity and Other Fundamentalisms

    +++ +++

    +++Pascal Gielen+++

    ISBN

    978-90-76936-39-0

    Graphic designer

    Stout / Kramer

    Number of pages

    120

    Book size

    12.4 x 18.6 cm

    Binding

    Hardcover

    Translation and final editing: Leo Reijnen. Editor: Mirjam Beerman, Steven van Teeseling

    This is a publication in a series of essays commissioned by the Mondriaan Fonds (former Netherlands Foundation for Visual Arts, Design and Architecture). 

    For more information: Mondriaan Fonds

    248 grms 

    +++

    The magic word these days is 'creativity'. And not just for artists: managers and policymakers alike demand creativity. Even family therapists and mediators urge us to find more creative solutions. Nowadays, creativity is all about positive morality. We expect nothing but good from it. But what remains of the meaning of the word when just about everybody is using it to death? And where does this hunger for creativity come from? Isn't it instead a sign of a creeping loss of true creativity?

    This essay primarily concerns itself with the social context of creativity. Pascal Gielen relates the story of the process of the social (re)creation of creativity by taking you on an eight-day journey.

    The text is part of a series issued by the Mondriaan Fund to promote thinking about visual art and artisthood.

    Pascal Gielen (1970) is director of the research center Arts in Society at the Groningen University where he is associate Professor sociology of art. Gielen leads also the research group and book series 'Arts in Society' (Fontys College for the Arts, Tilburg). He has written several books on contemporary art, cultural heritage and cultural politics.  In 2009 Gielen edited together with Paul De Bruyne the book Being an Artist in Post-Fordist Times, and he published his new monograph The Murmuring of the Artistic Multitude. Global Art, Memory and Post-Fordism. In 2011 De Bruyne en Gielen edited the book Community Art. The Politics of Trespassing and in January 2012 their book Teaching Art in the Neoliberal Realm. Realism versus Cynicism was launched. At the moment Gielen is composing the reader Institutional Attitudes. Instituting Art in a Flat World.
     

    €15.00

  • CUBIC JOURNAL issue #1 DESIGN SOCIAL
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    CUBIC JOURNAL issue #1 DESIGN SOCIAL

    +++Technology - Activism - Anti-Social+++

    +++Gerhard Bruyns & Peter Hasdell [eds.]+++

    ISBN

    978-94-92852-05-2

    Graphic designer

    Gabrielle Lai and Markus Wernli

    Number of pages

    216

    Book size

    20 x 26.5 cm / 7.87 x 10.43 inch

    Binding

    Paperback

    English

    Copy editor: Shannon Ross - Make No Bones Studio, Hong Kong

    Release date: Spring/Summer 2018

    ISSN 2589-7090 (print) ISSN 2589-7101 (online)

    Published in cooperation with The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Environmental & Interior Design, School of Design. Published with the support of The School of Design, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University and The Cubic Research Network.

    Cubic Journal is published in conjunction with Cubic Society and the Cubic Research Network as an academic platform aimed at the dissemination of design related research. Operating from within The  Hong Kong Polytechnic University's School of Design, the platforms aims to draw together global scholars in order to generate, exchange and discuss contemporary questions within the pursuit of advancing knowledge through and within a number of design disciplines.

    www.cubicjournal.org

    +++

    The inaugural issue of Cubic Journal questions the conditions of design-social in a wide range of different disciplines, groups,and stakeholders,in dynamic communities of practice that can lead design beyond its mere capabilities of synthesis into new forms of a social design praxis,whereby design is co-dependent on synthesis as well as analytic practices.

    The emergence of social media and the networked society, as exemplified by (but not limited to) the Internet of things, generates enormous potentialsthat reposition design as a means to synthesise emerging social complexities into new constellations. These have the capacity to foster new social forms and social design as a knowledge field in its own right.

    One of the ways design in this context becomes reconfigured is as the dynamic interconnections betweenpeople, practices and artefacts, in which the interactions lead to relational rather than objectified forms of design. Such approaches tend to be process driven rather than outcome based and activate design’s potential within both knowledge generation and knowledge transfer processes - that can be understood as ‘information’ or as design before design and design after design. Often misconstrued as purely a design approach, participatory design is,in fact,a rigorous research methodology involving a complex system of knowledge generation and co-design processes where the interactions of people, design artefacts, technologies, practices (activism) and knowledge, steers a course between participants’ tacit knowledge and the designer-researchers’analytical or technical knowledge. Design in this context is a complex mesh of tangible and intangible factors, (anti) socialforms and networks, information, contexts,and people, able to frame design processes and praxis that are adaptable for inter-disciplinary collaboration (horizontal); and for user and designer collaboration (vertical).

    Contributors to this issue include: Arie Graafland, Khaya Mchunu & Kim Berman, Gerhard Bruyns, Kacey Wong, Luke Tipene, Patrick Healy, Simone AbudMaliq Simone, Marko Stanojevic, Peter Hasdell, Jamie, Hanna Wirmanand Lukáš Likavčan.

     

    €25.00

  • CUBIC JOURNAL issue #2  Gender in Design
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    CUBIC JOURNAL issue #2 Gender in Design

    +++The GREAT small: Gender Design / Other - Different - Wilfull+++

    +++ Hanna Wirman & Uta Brandes [eds.]+++

    ISBN

    978-94-92852-09-0

    Graphic designer

    Gabrielle Lai and Markus Wernli

    Number of pages

    120

    Book size

    20 x 26.5 cm / 7.87 x 10.43 inch

    Binding

    Paperback

    English

    Copy editor: Shannon Ross - Make No Bones Studio, Hong Kong

    Release date: Spring/Summer 2019

    ISSN 2589-7090 (print) ISSN 2589-7101 (online)

    Published in cooperation with The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Environmental & Interior Design, School of Design. Published with the support of The School of Design, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University and The Cubic Research Network.

    Cubic Journal is published in conjunction with Cubic Society and the Cubic Research Network as an academic platform aimed at the dissemination of design related research. Operating from within The  Hong Kong Polytechnic University's School of Design, the platforms aims to draw together global scholars in order to generate, exchange and discuss contemporary questions within the pursuit of advancing knowledge through and within a number of design disciplines.

    www.cubicjournal.org

    +++ 

    Contributors to Cubic Journal issue #2 include: Katja Becker, Uta Brandes, Gerhard Bruyns, Leon Buker, Luisa Maria Calabrese, Tanja Godlewsky, Sugandha Gupta, Claudia Herling, Akkelies Van Nes, Sandy Ng, Hanna Wirman.

    Following Beauvoir, Butler, Barad, and numerous thinkers before and after, we concur that gender is constantly constructed through the regulated repetition of acts. Here we accept the role that both design and design practice have in creating gender(s). Designed products are both the results and the material processes of constructing gender as individuals and as socio-cultural notions. As such, they are not separate entities that would merely incarnate some pre-existing conceptions. Furthermore, intersectionality allows us to consider how ethnicity, class, and regional identities, such as those best addressed through a postcolonial framework, earmarks ‘gender in design’ as a positively messy and dynamic topic. Finally, as an acknowledgement of the ‘other’ genders involved, it is hoped that an expanded discussion will further address queer identities and design concerns specific to LGBTQI creators and audiences.

    The debate here commences from the valuable yet at times difficult discussions held at The GREAT small: Gender Design Conferenceco-organised by the issue editors at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University in 2014. Gender in Design within ‘the mind’ or as a ‘discussion’, as already implied by design, is often the work of wilful subjectswhere obedience, dismissal, moral law, and negative emotions meet in face of injustices.

    Issue 2 critically and analytically problematisesgender, its questions, and its appropriateness in relation to design. The interest here is centred on the question of ‘how’ genders are present and constructed through conflicts, gender fluidity, and manners of interpreting design approaches and problems. We further ask, ‘how’ the multitude of genders contributes to shaping the disciplinary course or reframes their understandings? Has the question of gender become a burden or catalyst for designers? What is the future that design should be looking at when considering gender?

     

    €25.00

  • CUBIC JOURNAL issue #3 DESIGN MAKING
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    CUBIC JOURNAL issue #3 DESIGN MAKING

    +++The Values Had, The Object Made, The Value Had | Practice . Making . Praxis+++

    +++Daniel Keith Elkin, James Stevens[eds.]+++

    ISBN

    978-94-92852-10-6

    Graphic designer

    Gabrielle Lai and Daniel Echeverri

    Number of pages

    216

    Book size

    20 x 26.5 cm / 7.87 x 10.43 inch

    Binding

    Paperback

    English

    Copy editor: Khokela K. A. Daula

    Release date: Spring/Summer 2020

    ISSN 2589-7090 (print) ISSN 2589-7101 (online)

    Published in cooperation with The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Environmental & Interior Design, School of Design.Published with the support of The School of Design, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University and The Cubic Research Network.

    Cubic Journal is published in conjunction with Cubic Society and the Cubic Research Network as an academic platform aimed at the dissemination of design related research. Operating from within The  Hong Kong Polytechnic University's School of Design, the platforms aims to draw together global scholars in order to generate, exchange and discuss contemporary questions within the pursuit of advancing knowledge through and within a number of design disciplines.

    www.cubicjournal.org


    +++

    'This issue of Cubic Journal concerns making, and the value-structures connected to the premise, before and after execution. Fifteen authors and constituent research teams present their work in manifested design research here. In this work, physical, semi-physical, and transitionally physical embodiments of objects, spaces, and prototypical design conjectures are part and parcel of the researchers’ progress. Embodiment neither preempts, nor follows their work, but is essentially the substance of research itself within these manuscripts. The editors collected this work as status-taking for a broad range of creative and scholarly enterprises in several regions of the world. European, Southeast Asian, and American authors in architectural and product design fields provide perspectives on making-centric design research, across manual, digital, post-digital, and post-consumer spectra
    of fabrication. But as an assemblage, these works are more than a catalogue. They prompt retrospective thought on the values held, and the value given, by these authors’ conjectural experiments in material form.' - from the introduction by the editors

    As the twenty-first century moves forward, technological changes re-propose the act ofmaking, the actualization of design agency, in different contexts. New notions of craft redefine movement from desire to reality as continuous and decentralized in the assignation of value. The liquidity of the archive of things-about-to-be and things which will only ephemerally be define a new schema of what it means to makeat all and limits of this boundary ask profound questions about the value of bodily experience. Within and without technological advancements, design makingimposes demands upon design praxis in both disciplinary and professional contexts. The adjoining of the two words implies distinction from centrist practice where the immediacy of making is absent. What are the starting biases privileging this immediacy? In most cases, the value structures are indelible or internal. In practice and pedagogy, clients and young designers each wonder why design-makers insist upon expensive and time-consuming processes moving objects from desire to actualisation. In the process, designers become something between and otherfromnormative practitioners and fabricators, articulating a definition of what design-makers uniquely contribute. But theirs is a difficult path to justify. How do design-makers continue, and what do they, and the society around them, gain through their work?

    Contributors to this issue include: Daniel Keith Elkin, James Stevens (editors), David Schafer, Sara Codarin, Lee Y.H. Brian, Guan Lee, Daniel Widrig, Philippe Casens, Nathalie Bruyère, Kuo Jze Yi, Eddie Chan, Fernando Bales, Elise Dechard, Daniel Echeverri.

     

    €25.00

  • Footprint 17 Vol 9/2 The 'Bread & Butter'of Architecture
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    Footprint 17 Vol 9/2 The 'Bread & Butter'of Architecture

    +++Investigating Everyday Practices+++

    +++Nelson Mota, Ricardo Agarez [eds.]+++

    ISBN

    978-94-90322-61-8

    Graphic designer

    Meagen Kerr

    Number of pages

    184

    Book size

    19 x 25.7 cm

    Binding

    Paperback

    English

    Copy editor: Heleen Schröder

    Release date: Autumn/Winter 2015

    Published in cooperation with Architecture Theory Chair (TU Delft) and Stichting Footprint: http://footprint.tudelft.nl/

    For a subscription: Bruil & Van de Staaij

    +++

    The canon of western contemporary architecture has overlooked everyday, 'salaried' architecture – overwhelming as it may have turned out to be in our built environment – praising instead the solo designer and his ground-breaking work. 

     Since World War I, the social role of the architect (in terms both of his or her place in social hierarchies and of his or her contribution for social betterment) seems to have been primarily tested, and largely consolidated, in 'departmental architecture'. Yet the work of county, city and ministerial architects, heads of department in welfare commissions, guilds and cooperatives, is seldom discussed as such: its specificity as the product of institutional initiatives and agents, as the outcome of negotiation between individual and collective agendas, remains little explored, even when authors celebrate the many public-designed projects that are part of the canon. On the other hand, commercially driven architecture and the business side of the profession are still anathema for many, despite being essential factors in the discipline's position in society.

    Footprint 17 addresses the architectural production of those who played their part in inconspicuous offices and unexciting departments, and that contribute insights to discuss the place of the architecture of 'bread & butter' in architectural history studies and in the politics of architectural design and theory. 

    This issue of Footprint explores intellectual frameworks, didactic practices, research methods and analytical instruments that project the disciplinary focus further than the work of the 'prime mover', discussing the relevance of 'salaried' architects and institutional agency in shaping the spatial and social practices of the everyday. 

    With text contributions by: Ricardo Agarez, Nelson Mota (editors), Nick Beech, Amir Djalali, Andri Gerber, Ellen Rowley, Tim Gough, Elizabeth Keslacy.  A visual essay by João Paulo Martins, Sofia Diniz. And review articles by Karen Lisa Burns, Justine Clark, Jullie Willis; Tahl Kaminer; Javier Arpa.

    Footprint is an academic journal dedicated to publishing architecture and urban research. Architecture and urbanism are the points of departure and the core interests of the journal. From this perspective, the journal encourages the study of architecture and the urban environment as a means of comprehending culture and society, and as a tool for relating them to shifting ideological doctrines and philosophical ideas. The journal promotes the creation and development – or revision - of conceptual frameworks and methods of inquiry. It is engaged in creating a body of critical and reflexive texts with a breadth and depth of thought which would enrich the architecture discipline and produce new knowledge, conceptual methodologies and original understandings.

    €25.00

  • Footprint 18 Vol 10/1 Constellation of Awakening: Benjamin and Architecture
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    Footprint 18 Vol 10/1 Constellation of Awakening: Benjamin and Architecture

    +++ +++

    +++Patrick Healy, Andrej Radman [eds.]+++

    ISBN

    978-94-90322-64-9

    Graphic designer

    Meagan Kerr

    Number of pages

    144

    Book size

    19 x 25.7 cm

    Binding

    paperback

    Release date: Spring/Summer 2016

    English

    Copy editor: Heleen Schröder

    Published in cooperation with Architecture Theory Chair (TU Delft) and Stichting Footprint: http://footprint.tudelft.nl/ 

    For a subscription: Bruil & Van de Staaij 

    +++
    With contributions by

    Patrick Healy, Andrej Radman (introduction), Stefan Koller, Lutz Robbers, Jolien Paeleman, Frances Hsu, Ross Lipton, Sarah K. Stanley, Rodrigo Rieiro Díaz, Stéphane Symons, Stephen Michael Witherford    

    In Das Passagen-Werk Benjamin cites a letter from Marx to Ruge, 'the reform of consciousness consists solely in [...] the awakening of the world from its dream about itself.' This idea of awakening recurs in Benjamin's methodological considerations and his many metaphors during the final thirteen years of his life. Benjamin set himself the pedagogical task of awakening 'the image-making medium within us, raising it to a stereoscopic and dimensional seeing into the depths of historical shadows.' His ambition was to develop the art of citing without quotation marks, a concept intimately related to that of montage.

    The importance of architectural theory for Benjamin is most evident in his last work. From his writings on Berlin childhood, his essay on Moscow and Naples, Benjamin's interest in urban topography can be seen to develop into a full analysis of the city, by developing a method which he refers to as physiognomic and in which, inspired by contemporary surrealist practise, the method of montage becomes critical for his showing how the 'now of recognition' in the image opens the historical to awareness, and constitutes the reality of history. He cites Giedion and sees his own work as engaged in a similar task: 'just as Giedion teaches us to read off the basic features of today's architecture in the buildings erected around 1850,' Benjamin writes, 'we in turn would recognise today's forms, in the life and in the apparently secondary lost forms of that epoch.' 

    It was a matter of immediate concern for Benjamin to examine the secondary, the excluded. By a displacement of the angle of vision a positive element would emerge, something different from that previously signified. History is in the nuance, the dialectical contrast as revealed in Benjamin's Parisian studies of the expressive character of the earliest industrial architecture, machines, department stores and advertisements. Nevertheless, as is clear from his note of the comment from Max Raphael's Proudhon, Marx, Picasso, Benjamin reproaches Marx for not having advanced along this way in the full measure of the possibilities of historical materialism.

    Footprint 18 investigates the following issues: what Benjamin understands by the 'constellation of awakening', how he conceptualises 'dialectical images', his deployment of montage, his refusal of a conception of either progress or decline, and his undertaking to show that the images belong not only to a particular time but attain legibility only at a particular time. Famously, according to Benjamin, image is that wherein what has been comes together in a flash with the now to form a constellation. With regard to the architectural theory Benjamin engaged directly with the tectonic tradition, especially the work of Bötticher. He posited the tectonic unconscious and the deployment of optical instruments as crucial for understanding the development which architecture carried from the luxus capitalist forms of commodity. In light of technical innovations in iron and glass, it expressed a form of projective dream work of the architectural around material realisations as products of the industrial revolution, with long consequences for the future. 

    Footprint is an academic journal dedicated to publishing architecture and urban research. Architecture and urbanism are the points of departure and the core interests of the journal. From this perspective, the journal encourages the study of architecture and the urban environment as a means of comprehending culture and society, and as a tool for relating them to shifting ideological doctrines and philosophical ideas. The journal promotes the creation and development – or revision - of conceptual frameworks and methods of inquiry. It is engaged in creating a body of critical and reflexive texts with a breadth and depth of thought which would enrich the architecture discipline and produce new knowledge, conceptual methodologies and original understandings.

    €25.00

  • Footprint 19 Spaces of Conflict
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    Footprint 19 Spaces of Conflict

    +++Vol 10/2 2016+++

    +++Malkit Shoshan, Marc Schoonderbeek [eds.]+++

    ISBN
    978-94-90322-72-4

    Pages

    170

    Design

    Meagen Kerr

    Size

    19 x 25.7 cm

    Binding

    Softcover

    English

    Date of release: Winter 2016 

    Published in cooperation with Architecture Theory Chair (TU Delft) and Stichting Footprint: http://footprint.tudelft.nl/

    For a subscription: Bruil & Van de Staaij 

    +++

    The terrorist attacks at the start of the 21st century catapulted the issue of space and conflict into the forefront of architectural debates. As a result, existing and newly emerging national, religious and ethnic conflicts in relation to urban space became the focus of attention in architecture. Though military thinking had already had a long-standing tradition in architectural history, the sudden emergence of new spaces of conflict considerably altered architectural discourse. Extreme conditions of war, militarisation, climate change as well as economic crisis are threatening to structurally reconfigure our living environments. Over a decade later, however, the aftermath of these urban intrusions seems to have produced a diversified field of both thinking and action in architecture, as the theorising of spatial conflicts has started to incorporate a wide variety of reflections from other disciplines while architectural practices have shown a remarkable adequacy in addressing spaces of conflict, crisis and disaster. 

    The forthcoming 19th issue of Footprint will focus on these more recent roles of architecture in the contemporary spaces of conflict. In this issue, departing from a spatial understanding of geopolitical, climatological and economical conflicts, we seek to introduce and add to the professional discourse new conditions, spaces and experimental practices. Focusing on 'conflict', we are interested in contributions that highlight the large scale and phenomenal transitions in the physical world and in society by extrapolating, through examples, the abundance of relations that can be traced between conflict, territory and architecture.

    In addition to this focus on the spatial consequences of conflict, we would be interested in clarifying the intrinsic relationships that can be traced between theory and practice. Conflict areas often prove to be fertile grounds for innovation and for the emergence of new spatial forms. In their extremity, conflicts often serve as an intensified example for spatial processes that happen elsewhere, both in our cities, territories and landscapes. The ongoing condition of crisis has allowed for the emergence of all sorts of speculative scenarios, and simultaneously given rise to the emergence of new discursive takes on spaces of resilience.

    €25.00